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The Weekend Read:

JURIST Guest Columnist Glenn C. Smith of the California Western School of Law discusses the potential implications of the US Supreme Court's recent opinion in Masterpiece CakeshopOne of the year's most-watched Supreme Court controversies, Masterpiece Cakeshop, Limited v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, was never likely to deliver the full face-off between Religious Free Exercise and Anti-Discrimination Rights that many people expected. As I'll explain more fully below, cake baker Jack Phillip's claim to avoid administrative sanctions despite …

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by David M. Crane
by Charles Lugosi
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This Day at Law

KKK bombs Church in Alabama

On September 15, 1963, members of the Klu Klux Klan bombed a predominantly African-American church in Birmingham, Alabama during the Civil Rights Movement. The blast at the 16th Street Baptist Church killed four young girls and injured twenty other people. Despite an investigation by the F.B.I., no one was charged with responsibility for the crime until Robert Chambliss was convicted of murder in 1977. His accomplices, Thomas Blaton, Jr. and Bobby Frank Cherry, were not tried and convicted until about twenty-five years later.Learn more about the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing and the trials of Blanton and Cherry from NPR.

Nuremberg race laws went into effect in Nazi Germany

On September 15, 1935, the Nuremberg Laws of Nazi Germany became effective, racially defining German citizenship and making Jews outcasts. The Reich Health Office issued the following chart in 1936 to assist in ascertaining the "admissibility of marriage between Aryans and non-Aryans": white circles represent on the chart are "pure Germans", while the circles with black indicate the proportion of Jewish blood. Review the Laws for Protection of the German Race on Citizenship, German Blood and German Honor, and Hereditary Health.

Nuremberg Laws went into effect in Nazi Germany

On September 15, 1935, the Nuremberg Laws of Nazi Germany became effective, racially defining German citizenship and making Jews outcasts. The Reich Health Office issued the following chart in 1936 to assist in ascertaining the "admissibility of marriage between Aryans and non-Aryans": white circles represent on the chart are "pure Germans", while the circles with black indicate the proportion of Jewish blood. Review the Laws for Protection of the German Race on Citizenship, German Blood and German Honor, and Hereditary Health.

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