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Legal news from Friday, February 27, 2015
by Valerie Howell

A Belgrade court on Friday considered whether to wipe the treason conviction against General Draza Mihailovic for his efforts supporting the Nazi regime during World War II. Serbian nationals showed up in droves to the courthouse to witness the decision on Mihailovic's oft contested legacy, and resolve a dispute that has divided the country for many years. Nationalist Serbians, …

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by Valerie Howell

Two senior UN relief officials expressed concern Thursday about the brutal violence that continues to plague Syria as a result of the country's internal conflict. In a presentation to the UN Security Council, Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator, Kyung-Wha Kang explained that conflict participants injure the …

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by Steven Wildberger

The parents Thailand's former crown princess Srirasmi Suwadee were arrested Friday after confessing to defamation of the royal family in violation of the nation's lese majeste law. The law, which criminalizes defamation to protect the royal family, carries with it a maximum sentence of 15 years in jail. Srirasmi's parents, Apiruj and Wanthanee, confessed to having a …

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by Alison Sacriponte

Nepal's Supreme Court on Thursday rejected amnesty for perpetrators of serious human rights abuses during the decade-long civil war that left more than 17,000 dead. The court struck down the amnesty provision from the law and said the consent of the victims is necessary for any reconciliation. The law was introduced last year to set up reconciliation …

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by Emelina Perez

A judge in Argentina on Thursday dismissed criminal allegations against President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner that had been brought by a prosecutor who accused her of conspiring to shield Iranian officials from responsibility for the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires. Judge Daniel Rafecas found that the criminal complaint, which …

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by Alison Sacriponte

Egyptian authorities on Thursday detained two police officers over allegations that they tortured a lawyer to death inside a Cairo police station. The detentions came after Prosecutor Mohammed Abdel-Shafi summoned seven police officers from the station where the event took place. Five were released and the remaining two have not yet been charged. According to Interior Ministry spokesperson Abdel-Fattah …

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by Colleen Mallick

The appeals chamber of the International Criminal Court (ICC) on Friday upheld the trial chamber's decision to acquit Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui, a Congolese man accused of crimes against humanity and war crimes. Ngudjolo was acquitted in December 2012 of leading a 2003 attack on the village of Bogoro in the Democratic Republic of …

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by Emelina Perez

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on Thursday adopted Open Internet rules by a 3-2 vote. The Open Internet Order reclassifies broadband internet as a telecommunications service under Title II of the Communications Act, bringing broadband providers within the authority of the FCC. The order adopted three rules: (1) broadband providers cannot block content, …

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by Colleen Mallick

A former aide of Osama Bin Laden has been found guilty on Thursday of plotting the 1998 al-Qaeda bombings of US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania that killed 224 people. Extradited from the UK to the US in 2012, Saudi national Khalid Al-Fawwaz was convicted on four counts of conspiracy by the US District Court for the …

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by Brittany Felder

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) issued a preliminary judgment on Thursday that found a US soldier could possible seek asylum in Germany if he can show a proper reason for his desertion. André Shepherd deserted in Germany in 2007 and sought asylum there the following year. He allegedly deserted because he believed the Iraq War …

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by Laura DeGeer

The Wisconsin Senate on Wednesday approved Senate Bill 44, commonly known as the right-to-work bill. In general, the legislation provides that employees cannot be required to join a labor organization. Without financial support, unions are limited in their ability to bargain and recruit new members. Wisconsin would be the twenty-fifth state to enact a right-to-work law, …

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