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Legal news from Wednesday, April 29, 2015
by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments in two cases Wednesday. In Glossip v. Gross the court heard arguments on whether Oklahoma's lethal injection protocol is unconstitutional under the Eighth Amendment. The case originated when four death row inmates filed a complaint against the director of the Oklahoma Department of …

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by Kimberly Bennett

The US Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that courts have authority to review whether the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has fulfilled its duty under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to attempt conciliation. Additionally, the court ruled that the appropriate scope of judicial review of the EEOC's conciliation activities is …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Wednesday in Williams-Yulee v. The Florida Bar that states may ban judicial candidates from personally soliciting campaign donations. In an opinion by Chief Justice John Roberts, the court found that such restrictions do not violate the First Amendment. Roberts wrote:Judges are not politicians, even when they come …

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by Kimberly Bennett

The Giza Criminal Court on Wednesday sentenced 69 Muslim Brotherhood supporter to 25 years in prison for attacking and burning a church in a village near Cairo in 2013 during protests against former president Mohamed Morsi. In addition, Judge Mohamed Nagi Shehata also sentenced two other juvenile defendants to 10 years …

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by Addison Morris

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) on Wednesday restricted bans on blood donations from homosexual men. Since 1983, France automatically and permanently banned blood donations from all men who had ever had sex with another man, calling it a measure of safety against spreading the HIV virus. This ban was seen by many critics …

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by Addison Morris

A Dutch appellate court ruled Wednesday that Gen. Thom Karremans, who ordered Bosnian Muslims away from a UN peacekeeping compound during the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, will not be prosecuted. Karremans, along with two other soldiers, faced charges for forcing three Bosnian Muslim men to leave the UN compound during the massacre, which ultimately led …

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