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Legal news from Friday, June 22, 2018
by Erin McCarthy Holliday

In WesternGeco LLC v. ION Geophysical Corporation, the US Supreme Court determined Friday that a patentee who has shown patent infringement in the US may recover damages for the profits that it would have earned outside of the US if the infringement had not occurred. The dispute is between two companies that have systems to …

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by Erin McCarthy Holliday

The US Supreme Court ruled in Currier v. Virginia on Friday that a defendant indicted on multiple charges who agrees to have each charge tried separately gives up his right to benefit from an acquittal in the first trial. Virginia man Michael Currier faced trial for breaking and entering and grand larceny. While …

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by Erin McCarthy Holliday

The US Supreme Court ruled Friday in Ortiz v. United States that it has jurisdiction to review decisions made by the Court of Appeals of the Armed Forces. It also held that simultaneously serving on both the Court of Military Commissions Review (CMCR) and the Court of Criminal Appeals (CCA) is lawful. Dalmazzi v. …

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by Jacqueline Buffa

New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu vetoed a bill Thursday that would have abolished the death penalty. Currently, the law states: "A person convicted of a capital murder may be punished by death." The bill proposed that those found guilty would instead be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. In New Hampshire, very few …

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by Jaclyn Belczyk

The US Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Friday in Carpenter v. United States that police must generally obtain a warrant in order to obtain cell phone location data. This case arose from petitioner Timothy Carpenter's conviction for armed robbery, for which he was sentenced to 116 days in prison. At trial, the prosecution offered evidence …

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by Tate Brown

The European Court of Human Rights on Thursday rejected an appeal by Norwegian mass murderer Fjotolf Hansen, previously known as Anders Behring Breivik. Hansen was convicted of killing 77 people and wounding 42 others at a political youth camp and was sentenced to 21 years of preventive detention. In his appeal, he challenged the conditions of his detention, claiming …

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